Celebrate

Father’s
Day

with Tommy

FATHER’S DAY TOMMY CARD

Buy a Tommy Fathers Day Card and you are buying a card for a father and a special insert inside with messages from RBLI veterans, plus your purchase helps support our veterans. Why not check out our shop and buy a gift from our range of products. Our veterans have produced a quality card for Fathers Day with an insert featuring three of our veterans who reflect on their Fathers lives. Buying this card will help support RBLI and will go towards veteran fathers and grandfathers who need our support.

FATHER’S DAY TOMMY CARD

Buy a Tommy Fathers Day Card and you are buying a card for a father and a special insert inside with messages from RBLI veterans, plus your purchase helps support our veterans. Why not check out our shop and buy a gift from our range of products. Our veterans have produced a quality card for Fathers Day with an insert featuring three of our veterans who reflect on their Fathers lives. Buying this card will help support RBLI and will go towards veteran fathers and grandfathers who need our support.

BUY TOMMY PRODUCTS TO
CELEBRATE FATHER’S DAY
Tommy Fathers Day Card
Father’s Day Tommy Card
VJ Day Tommy
REGISTER YOUR INTEREST FOR VJ DAY TOMMY
Garden Tommy
Buy A Garden Tommy
VE Day Tommy
Buy Our VE Day Tommy
FATHER’S DAY GIFT IDEAS

Father’s Day is a day of honoring fatherhood and paternal bonds, as well as the influence of fathers in society. Father’s Day is held on the third Sunday of June in the United Kingdom. It is a day to honor fathers and father figures, such as grandfathers and fathers-in-law. Many people make a special effort to visit their fathers or send them a card or gifts. In our shop at RBLI we are selling a range of gifts including our two in one Tommy Fathers Day Card. A beautiful printed card on quality paper stock, blank for you to fill out or we can print a message for you. A special insert with best wishes from veteran fathers here at RBLI who reflect on their fathers and includes a Tommy envelope. Our VE Day Tommy was extremely popular this year, in fact we have received thousands of requests for a Special Edition Tommy for VJ Day to add to the collection. With this in mind we have decided as a way of celebrating Father’s Day you can register your interest and we will make sure you are one of the first to access the new product to purchase before it’s official launch. You will recieve an email the minute its ready to purchase. We are already working on the VJ Tommy right now.

Fathers Reflect

Four veterans have kindly sent their best wishes to all your fathers out there and have given thought about their fathers too.

TIM BROWN

Former Royal Engineer and AGC, Tim Brown was diagnosed with PTSD after serving in the Armed Forces for 23 years. His significant military career, which began in 1987, includes the Gulf War, Bosnia, a two-year tour of Northern Ireland and 2 tours of Iraq.# However, unfortunately, his extensive service eventually took a toll on his mental health.# Tim is now a Team Leader in RBLI’s leading social enterprise Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company.Tim’s father, Ray, served in the Merchant Navy from 1941 – 1945. Those four long years of World War Two saw Ray serve in the Italy landings at the Bay of Naples, support in
the D-Day landings and help protect Burma and India from Japanese invasion. #Ray passed in 1977 when Tim was just nine, leaving behind his wife Connie and the medals he received for his heroism: The 1935-1945 star, the Atlantic Star with France
& Germany clasp, The Burma Star, the Italy Star and The War Medal. Tim is a proud father to seven.

Tony Mountain

Also a father, Tony served in the First Battalion Princess of Wales’ Royal Regiment from 1998 until 2001 – his service career included an operational tour in Kosovo in 2000. He left the forces with post-traumatic stress disorder and found himself facing homelessness before moving into a home on RBLI’s village and securing employment in Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company.
Tony’s father, spent 14 years in the Army, rising to the rank
of corporal in the Royal Engineers. His career saw him move frequently, with much of his service career spent in Germany and landmine training in Canada. Tony cites his father’s commitment to his service career as his inspiration for serving in the Armed Forces.

Charles Boyer

Father of two and a D-Day veteran, Charles Boyer was awarded the Legion d’Honneur, the highest French order of merit
for military and civil merits for his actions on Sword Beach, Normandy, in 1944. Moving later to the Military Police after sustaining injury in Holland, Charles witnessed the momentous German surrender at Luneburg Heath.
His father, Harry, served in the Great War having joined the Army at the tender age of 17 – just as his son would go on to do fewer than two decades later.
Little is known about Harry as his service records were destroyed, along with the records of thousands of other heroes in the Arnside Street fire brought about by German bombings in 1940.
What is known however, is that his campaigns in Mesopotamia – modern-day Iraq – during the Great War served as the inspiration for his son Charles’ heroism of the Second World War.

Steve Hammond

This year many families have been separated by the Covid 19 lockdown, keeping away from older relatives especially. At the same time, for the 75th Anniversary of VE Day, many of us have been thinking more than ever about our fathers and our grandfathers, and reflecting on what they have given for us. I know that on VE Day itself my grandfather was still away serving in a Field Hospital in Germany. In a similar way families this year have been apart on significant days. We have all had to send messages instead and think about our loved ones from afar. I hope that our new Father’s Day cards can help people express their appreciation, and feel part of a community that completely understands this separation

WHERE DOES THE TERM ‘TOMMY’
COME FROM?

The origins of the term Tommy is widely disputed, the most common interpretation is that the term comes from Tommy Atkins, which is slang for a common soldier in the British Army. The term Tommy was established during the nineteenth century, but is particularly associated with World War 1. Legend has it that German soldiers would call out to “Tommy” across no man’s land if they wanted to speak to a British soldier.
Established in 1919, RBLI were helping and supporting many wounded, injured and sick ex-Forces personnel returning from World War I, including Tommys.

WHERE DOES THE TERM ‘TOMMY’
COME FROM?

The origins of the term Tommy is widely disputed, the most common interpretation is that the term comes from Tommy Atkins, which is slang for a common soldier in the British Army. The term Tommy was established during the nineteenth century, but is particularly associated with World War 1. Legend has it that German soldiers would call out to “Tommy” across no man’s land if they wanted to speak to a British soldier.
Established in 1919, RBLI were helping and supporting many wounded, injured and sick ex-Forces personnel returning from World War I, including Tommys.

ABOUT RBLI

Established in 1919 to help wounded, injured and sick ex-Forces returning from World War I, RBLI has a proud heritage as a leading charity helping to improve the lives of those who sacrificed so much. Royal British Legion Industries (RBLI) is separate to The Royal British Legion, receives no financial support from the annual poppy appeal, and must raise its own funds to deliver care and employability support.

Today RBLI runs a social enterprise factory called Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company (BBMC), provides care and assisted living for older veterans, accommodation for families, adapted homes for veterans with disabilities, and emergency accommodation for homeless veterans.

In fact RBLI’s integrated Village in Aylesford, Kent is a national leader in veteran care. RBLI is also helping injured, disabled and unemployed veterans all over the UK through LifeWorks which is an outstanding employability programme helping 83% of veterans into work or training within one year.

STEVE SHERRY OBE

RBLI CEO

This year many families have been separated by the Covid 19 lockdown, keeping away from older relatives especially. At the same time, for the 75th Anniversary of VE Day, many of us have been thinking more than ever about our fathers and our grandfathers, and reflecting on what they have given for us. I know that on VE Day itself my grandfather was still away serving in a Field Hospital in Germany. In a similar way families this year have been apart on significant days. We have all had to send messages instead and think about our loved ones from afar. I hope that our new Father’s Day cards can help people express their appreciation, and feel part of a community that completely understands this separation.

THERE BUT NOT THERE LEAVES ITS
LEGACY TO RBLI

A high-profile national remembrance project set up to commemorate a century since the end of the First World War has left its own legacy to Royal British Legion Industries (RBLI), ensuring that its work continues to benefit the country’s most vulnerable veterans.
There But Not There (TBNT), run by military charity Remembered, was launched in 2018 to ‘commemorate, educate and heal’ through the installation of moving World War I Tommy figures in communities throughout the UK.
RBLI and TBNT first joined forces at the beginning of the commemorative Tommy project, with veterans at RBLI’s social enterprise, Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company, producing a range of Tommy figures and the responsibility for their distribution.
Former head of the British Army and There But Not There patron Lord Dannatt said: “I am delighted that RBLI will be continuing the remarkable work achieved by Remembered over the last two years. The Tommy is an iconic figure symbolising sacrifice and service. RBLI are the ideal partners to keep this powerful symbol in the forefront of the nation’s recognition of those who have paid the ultimate price for our freedom and security.”
Today, Lord Dannett continues his support, including the backing of the RBLI’s s successful VE Day campaign.

BUY OUR TWO IN ONE TOMMY FATHERS DAY CARD AT £4.99
THERE BUT NOT THERE LEAVES ITS
LEGACY TO RBLI

A high-profile national remembrance project set up to commemorate a century since the end of the First World War has left its own legacy to Royal British Legion Industries (RBLI), ensuring that its work continues to benefit the country’s most vulnerable veterans.
There But Not There (TBNT), run by military charity Remembered, was launched in 2018 to ‘commemorate, educate and heal’ through the installation of moving World War I Tommy figures in communities throughout the UK.
RBLI and TBNT first joined forces at the beginning of the commemorative Tommy project, with veterans at RBLI’s social enterprise, Britain’s Bravest Manufacturing Company, producing a range of Tommy figures and the responsibility for their distribution.
Former head of the British Army and There But Not There patron Lord Dannatt said: “I am delighted that RBLI will be continuing the remarkable work achieved by Remembered over the last two years. The Tommy is an iconic figure symbolising sacrifice and service. RBLI are the ideal partners to keep this powerful symbol in the forefront of the nation’s recognition of those who have paid the ultimate price for our freedom and security.”
Today, Lord Dannett continues his support, including the backing of the RBLI’s s successful VE Day campaign.

BUY OUR TWO IN ONE TOMMY FATHERS DAY CARD AT £4.99